Couple of Pairs – Risotto con Vino Rosso, Rosmarino e Cipolla Caramellata

As it was Valentine’s Day just about a week ago, maybe it is appropriate to talk about pairs in this post. I’m not actually sure if Italians really celebrate Valentine’s Day or whether it is one of those American things that was imported to all Europeans by romantic Hollywood movies and clever marketing people. Commercial, imported, Italian or not – I don’t really care though. As a more or less hopeless romantic, I welcome every opportunity in life to celebrate love and loved ones anyway!

Although Italians have the stereotypical reputation of being quite romantic, the Italian kitchen is traditionally less welcoming for pairing. You have your antipasto, primo and secondo all to be enjoyed as separate dishes. The only exception to this rule are contorni i.e. the side dishes. However, for proper Italian kitchen, pasta and risotto never qualify as contorni.

So maybe we shouldn’t tell this to any Italians, but when combining this risotto with our secondo of deer, we considered ourselves quite successful match-makers! In a risotto, a typical pair with the rice is white wine but also red wine can work fantastically well as in today’s recipe. As a result, the colour of this risotto also corresponds nicely with a loving mood.

Finally a third type of coupling worth mentioning is adding a nice little twist to a relatively simple dish such as this: the caramelized onions definitely take it to the next level of culinary love ❤

Risotto with Red Wine, Rosemary and Caramelized Onion

Serves 4

320 g Carnaroli rice (80 g per person)

1 onion (red or yellow)

15 g butter

2 small glasses of red wine

2 l of meat stock

2-3 tbsp parmesan

1 sprig of rosemary

salt, pepper

For the caramelized onion

½ middle-sized onion

1 knob of butter

1 tbsp cane sugar

1 small glass of red wine (the same as for the risotto obviously)

 

Peel and cut the onion into thin slices. In a pan, melt the butter (on a low heat) and the onion. Stir and cover the pan with a lid. Let the onion cook for several minutes until it is soft and transparent.

Add the rice and increase the heat. Toast the rice for a few minutes and stir continuously. Pour the wine into the pan and let it evaporate.

Lower the heat and add the rosemary and a few scoops of the meat stock, stir and cover the pan again with a lid. Repeat the steps of adding the stock and mixing the risotto until the rice is cooked. This takes about 18 minutes.

In the mean time, prepare the caramelized onion. Slice the onion thinly. Take another pan and melt some butter in it. Keep the heat low, add the onion, cover the pan with a lid and again let the onion cook for several minutes until soft. Add the wine and let it boil gently (thus reducing the amount of liquid). After a few minutes when the amount of wine has been reduced to about a half, add the cane sugar and mix well. Continue cooking for some additional minutes while ensuring that the onion doesn’t get too dry (you can add some wine in case it does).

Once the rice of the risotto is cooked (it should be a little bit  al dente) remove the sprig of rosemary, add one more scoop of the meat stock, the parmesan and a little bit more butter (to your taste). Stir well. Remove the pan from the heat, cover with a lid and let it rest very shortly. Serve the risotto with the caramelized onion sprinkled on top.

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The Chic Chick – Pollo alla Cacciatora

You may have noticed that one type of ingredient has been absent from my first ten posts in this blog, i.e. carne. The simple reason for this is that I haven’t eaten any red meat for 15 years. It has actually been so long that I no longer remember why I stopped. However, as I haven’t really missed it since, this chicken cooked in a sauce of red wine and tomatoes is still the reddest as far as my meat eating goes.

At least in Finland, one of the current food buzzes is about meat cooked slowly, and I think this dish is on that trend. Although you do not need an entire night to prepare it, its slow simmering phase ensures that the chicken absorbs the maximum amount of the fabulous flavours of the sauce whilst obtaining a fantastically soft consistency. It also seems that even Jamie Oliver and Nigella Lawson have developed their own versions of this. However, obviously I wouldn’t resort to any English trendy interpretations of this dish even if they are Jamie’s or Nigella’s, as I have the opportunity to learn these things straight from the Italian horse’s mouth!

On the other hand, according to my Google research, pollo alla cacciatora is actually a very traditional stew with dozens and dozens of variations from different parts of Italy. The recipe I tried is apparently of Tuscan origin. I also prepared some simple polenta to accompany this stew as recommended but I am sure e.g. mashed potatoes, rice and pasta should work well too!

Hunter-Style Chicken

Serves 4

1 chicken (or 2-3 chicken breast fillets and 2-3 chicken legs)

1 onion, chopped

2 carrots, chopped

3 celery stalks, chopped

1 garlic clove

½ glass of olive oil

1 glass of red wine

400 g peeled tomatoes

1 sprig of rosemary

1 bunch of fresh parsley, chopped

salt, pepper

Clean the chicken and chop it into large chunks. Leave the skin on as it will give more flavour to the sauce. Heat the oil on a frying pan/ casserole and add the chicken. Cook the chicken pieces for about 10 minutes until their both sides are golden. Add the onion, the garlic, the carrots, the celery, a pinch of salt, some pepper and the rosemary. Continue frying for at least 5 minutes until the veggies have a “good colour”. Pour the red wine into the sauce and let it evaporate. Add the tomatoes and cover the pan with a lid. Let the chicken cook at a medium heat for at least 30 minutes. If the stew seems to get too dry during this phase, you can add some hot water or broth. Finally, add the parsley and serve with the accompaniment of your choice.